Sep 12, 2019

Our Collections Research Centre: the next step


This week we reached a major landmark in the development of the Museum’s new Collections Research Centre. We’ve just been handed the keys to the brand new Colin Forbes Building, a purpose-built collections store to house our internationally important rock and fossil collections.  We now start the ambitious task of moving our rock collection – weighing more than 150 tonnes – from a variety of locations across Cambridge.  Bringing our collections together, and creating a space where we can welcome research visitors enables us to take a big step towards our aim of creating a world-leading centre for Earth Sciences collections research.

Category: General
Posted by: Sandra

Inside the building, the environment is kept at a steady temperature and humidity, to minimise degradation of the rock and fossil collections, while within the building a special cold store will house the Museum’s archive and photographic collections, ensuring that these important materials continue to be available for researchers from across the world.  The foundations have been specially designed to withstand the exceptional weight of the collection. 



We will be welcoming our first public visitors this Friday as part of the annual Open Cambridge event, and look forward to developing more opportunities for members of the public to come and see our collections, and understand their vital role in understanding our planet.  We are also looking forward to offering opportunities for people to come and be part of the collections move, with behind-the-scenes volunteering opportunities – watch out for these on the Museum website later in the year. 



We are also delighted to welcome a new member of the Museum team. Catherine Craston will be playing a key role in moving the collections into the store, and will be working with a team of volunteers to complete this mammoth task. 

If you’d like to know more about this exciting project, or are interested in hearing more about volunteering opportunities, please get in touch with the museum at sedgwickmuseum@esc.cam.ac.uk

Dr Liz Hide
eah12@cam.ac.uk
Sedgwick Museum Director




This half-term, WALLY, the world’s favourite children’s book character – wearing a red-and-white striped shirt and black-rimmed specs – will be travelling the country, appearing in museums, including a visit to the Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences, and the University Museum of Zoology, Cambridge. Families will be able to join the search for Wally as part of Where’s Wally? The Big Museum Hunt, organised by Walker Books and Kids in Museums, to celebrate the release of the new book, Where’s Wally? Double Trouble at the Museum.




My name is Andrew Simpson and I am a gallery volunteer at the Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences and a recent MGeol graduate in Geology with Paleobiology from the University of Leicester. My main interest is in vertebrate palaeontology, however, I like writing about all facets of palaeontology, from evolutionary history to fossil lagerstätten.



This week we reached a major landmark in the development of the Museum’s new Collections Research Centre. We’ve just been handed the keys to the brand new Colin Forbes Building, a purpose-built collections store to house our internationally important rock and fossil collections.  We now start the ambitious task of moving our rock collection – weighing more than 150 tonnes – from a variety of locations across Cambridge.  Bringing our collections together, and creating a space where we can welcome research visitors enables us to take a big step towards our aim of creating a world-leading centre for Earth Sciences collections research.