Apr 20, 2020

Staring at Stones


What can you find in your gravel at home?
Category: 2020
Posted by: Sarah

The flint gravel used for Cambridge paths and borders is ‘full’ of fossils – if you look hard and long enough!

This photo contains nine fossils - three sponges, three belemnites and three Gryphea bivalves - can you spot them?

The sponges lived on the Chalk seabed and their remains were surrounded by the silica, which hardened into flint.

The belemnites and Grypheas are older, early Cretaceous or possibly Jurassic age fossils whose durability allowed them to survive when the rock that contained them was eroded away.

The belemnites were part of the body of extinct squid-like animals.

The Grypheas lived as oyster-like bivalves on the seafloor.

Douglas Palmer

Sedgwick Museum

Temporarily closed due to Covid-19
We are working closely with the University of Cambridge on plans to reopen as soon as it is safe to do so in line with public health guidance, and are working with our partners to revise our programme in light of the current crisis. We will announce our plans and details of reopening in due course.
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May 27, 2020

In this series of blogs our collections move volunteers will tell you all about their experiences of the ‘Moving a Mountain’ project so far. This week they tell us what has surprised them about the project.


May 18, 2020

In this series of blogs our collections move volunteers will tell you all about their experiences of the ‘Moving a Mountain’ project so far. This week they tell us about the different specimens they’ve seen.


Apr 24, 2020

Our first online exhibition ‘Dawn of the Wonderchicken’, is now live!



Sedgwick Museum Collections and Research centre


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If you would like to discuss how you might contribute to the Sedgwick Museum Collections Store, please contact Professor Richard Harrison, Head of Department.

To make a donation to the Sedgwick Museum Collections Store please visit our online giving page.

Studying Earth Sciences at Cambridge University

Discover more about studying Earth Sciences at the University of Cambridge in this video featuring Museum Curator of Mineralogy and Petrology Professor Marian Holness and Sir David Attenborough