Jun 28, 2017

Lyme Regis Rocks


How do you reach an untapped audience 4 hours away? You join forces with colleagues in affiliated organisations and travel down to the seaside together to do some outreach!
Category: General
Posted by: Nicola

Over the May Bank Holiday weekend, four Cambridge organisations took part in the Lyme Regis Fossil Festival. Over the past few years the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) have been joined by the UK Antarctic heritage Trust (UKAHT) and the Polar Museum at the Scott Polar Research Institute (SPRI). This year the Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences also joined in. 

On the Friday we ran sessions for over 700 school children featuring geology, biology, palaeontology, and living and working in the Antarctic extremes.
dressing up

For the rest of the weekend we were open to the general public. By pooling our resources we were able to offer substantially more to festival visitors this year including; ask the expert a question using the walkie-talkies, fossil rubbing, ammonite themed craft activities, Antarctic small world play with fake snow, dressing up in old and new polar gear, penguin height measuring, exploring an Antarctic field camp, looking at Antarctic fossils as well as recent biological finds.
odd ones out

In addition to the geological and Antarctic themed stands we also ran drop in sessions for teachers with the Jurassic Heritage Coast Trust education team. This was a great chance for us to meet teachers and inspire them to think more broadly about incorporating geology into their teaching. It was also an opportunity for us to establish links with the Jurassic Coast team and share educational ideas and resources.

As part of the Fossil Festival programme, Naomi Chapman from the Polar Museum and Huw Griffiths from BAS gave a talk about Stitching Scientific Research
Antarctic map

Despite an extremely soggy Sunday, we reached approximately 8500 people over the weekend.

Will we return next year?
Yes, without a doubt!

Naomi Chapman (Education and Outreach at the Polar Museum)
Nicola Skipper (Education Co-ordinator at the Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences)



Monday to Friday
10:00 to 13:00 & 14:00 to 17:00

Saturday
10:00 to 16:00 

Sunday
Closed

We are CLOSED on Good Friday but open Saturday and Monday as usual

 





The UCM India Unboxed series continues with the puzzling story of the fiery meteorites which were cold to the touch when they fell to earth in northwest India 157 years ago.



This was the question we were asked by Kanta Kiyomoto a year 8 student at Cambridge International School. Kanta is studying various forms and sources of radiation for his Silver CREST award and wondered if we could help out with some radioactive gems.



How do you reach an untapped audience 4 hours away? You join forces with colleagues in affiliated organisations and travel down to the seaside together to do some outreach!


 

Publications

'Tools of the Trade'
Available to purchase in the Sedgwick Museum shop

Tools of the Trade

Agostino Scilla's
'Vain Speculation Undeceived by Sense'
English translation available to download.
Agostino Scilla download

Our Rocks are on the Move!
We are reuniting our important rock collections under one roof! Can you help support the building of our new Sedgwick Museum Collections store? Read more and donate here


Friends of the Sedgwick Museum prizewinners give us their thoughts on their time at the Museum in 2016
Click here to read

Work Experience at the Sedgwick - read about our latest student to visit us for two weeks and experience life in a Museum. 

Studying Earth Sciences at Cambridge University


Did you know?
The University of Cambridge is listed at the top of The Complete University's Guide 2016 for geology.

Discover more about studying Earth Sciences at the University of Cambridge in this video featuring Museum Curator of Mineralogy and Petrology Professor Marian Holness and Sir David Attenborough