Building Stones Collection

The John Watson Building Stones Collection is named after John Watson (1842-1918), who donated his collection of approximately 300 British and foreign stones and specimens illustrating the manufacture of plasters and cements to the Museum in 1905. Watson had retired from his work in the Portland Cement industry and continued to develop the collection until his death in 1918. Today it comprises approximately 2,500 traditional building stones, roofing slates, road stones, flagstones and decorative and ornamental stones that were in extensive use throughout Britain and it's colonies during the 19th and early 20th centuries.

The collection is housed in the former Museum of Economic Geology in the Department of Earth Sciences. The collection is open to the public by appointment only.

Monday to Friday
10:00 to 13:00 & 14:00 to 17:00

Saturday
10:00 to 16:00 

Sunday
Closed



On the 26th of February, 1918 the hospital ship HMHS Glenart Castle left Newport, South Wales, heading for Brest in France. On board were 63 nurses, medical orderlies and officers, along with its crew and 99 wounded patients. One of the medical officers on board was the 49 year-old Captain Lewis Moysey RAMC, a graduate of Caius College and very keen amateur geologist who donated a substantial collection of Carboniferous fossils to the Sedgwick Museum.



On Sunday September 9th Google’s banner headline in Australia (https://g.co/doodle/ytbdqa ) celebrated the 111th birthday of a palaeontologist – the late  Dorothy Hill (1907-1997).