Cambridge Curiosities

We like collecting here at the Sedgwick; we’ve been doing it since 1728 when John Woodward left his collection to the University. The museum now holds over 1.5 million objects - from fossils, rocks and minerals to notebooks, letters, photographs and diaries. Our collections not only have scientific value but also contain the hidden histories of their collectors - their travels, areas of study, the progression of their careers, and the relationships they had with their families, friends, mentors, peers and students.
Curating cambridge logo
As part of Curating Cambridge 2014 we launched a community cabinet, where we invite members of the local community to curate their own display of geological objects. Working with the museum staff, the displays will aim to showcase the collections held by visitors in the local area and help reveal both the science and the personal stories behind them.

2018 Display - Current display by local young geologist Alex Mattin
2016 Display - With thanks to Sandra Freshney
2014 Display - With thanks to the Friends of the Sedgwick Museum

We're curious... what do you collect?
If you have a geological collection of your own and you would like to see it displayed in the museum, email museumeducation@esc.cam.ac.uk with a photo and tell us:.

What is in your collection?
How you got started?
How many objects you have?
What is the most curious thing in it?

Monday to Friday
10:00 to 13:00 & 14:00 to 17:00

Saturday
10:00 to 16:00 

Sunday
Closed



Historic fossils from Agostino Scilla’s collection within the Sedgwick Museum’s Woodwardian cabinets are currently on display in the Royal Society’s summer exhibition in London. Called ‘Science made Visible: Drawings, Prints, Objects’, the exhibit explores the questions of how and when science become visual; how drawings, diagrams and charts came to be used alongside words and objects; who made them and what made them scientific?




All the Museum and Department were very sad to hear of the death of former staff member Rod Long. Rod, Uncle Rod as he was affectionately known, was to many people the face of the Museum. Dave Norman, our long time Director, has kindly written his recollections of a man who, put simply, we all loved him for his friendly, helpful and kind nature.
Liz Harper