Cambridge Curiosities

We like collecting here at the Sedgwick; we’ve been doing it since 1728 when John Woodward left his collection to the University. The museum now holds over 1.5 million objects - from fossils, rocks and minerals to notebooks, letters, photographs and diaries. Our collections not only have scientific value but also contain the hidden histories of their collectors - their travels, areas of study, the progression of their careers, and the relationships they had with their families, friends, mentors, peers and students.
Curating cambridge logo
As part of Curating Cambridge 2014 we launched a community cabinet, where we invite members of the local community to curate their own display of geological objects. Working with the museum staff, the displays will aim to showcase the collections held by visitors in the local area and help reveal both the science and the personal stories behind them.

2018 Display - Current display by local young geologist Alex Mattin
2016 Display - With thanks to Sandra Freshney
2014 Display - With thanks to the Friends of the Sedgwick Museum

We're curious... what do you collect?
If you have a geological collection of your own and you would like to see it displayed in the museum, email museumeducation@esc.cam.ac.uk with a photo and tell us:.

What is in your collection?
How you got started?
How many objects you have?
What is the most curious thing in it?

Monday to Friday
10:00 to 13:00 & 14:00 to 17:00

Saturday
10:00 to 16:00 

Sunday
Closed



On the 26th of February, 1918 the hospital ship HMHS Glenart Castle left Newport, South Wales, heading for Brest in France. On board were 63 nurses, medical orderlies and officers, along with its crew and 99 wounded patients. One of the medical officers on board was the 49 year-old Captain Lewis Moysey RAMC, a graduate of Caius College and very keen amateur geologist who donated a substantial collection of Carboniferous fossils to the Sedgwick Museum.



On Sunday September 9th Google’s banner headline in Australia (https://g.co/doodle/ytbdqa ) celebrated the 111th birthday of a palaeontologist – the late  Dorothy Hill (1907-1997).