Current Temporary Exhibitions

To complement the permanent displays, the Sedgwick Museum curates temporary exhibitions. These include collaborations with researchers and artists and also reflect relevant news stories, events and anniversaries.

Bicentenary of The Cambridge Philsophical Society

April 2019

Exactly 200 years ago three Cambridge geologists –Adam Sedgwick, John Henslow and Daniel Clarke, founded a new society for the promotion of natural science in the University, looking to the Geological Society of London as a model.

Before long, the Cambridge Philosophical Society was a runaway success and the renaissance of Cambridge science was well underway.

Our new temporary exhibit explores this early history and the many contributions by geologists past and present.

Illuminating the start of complex life: spatial analyses of Ediacaran communities

Opened March 2019

Cambridge researchers are using cutting edge 3D scanning techniques to understand a community of ancient fossils dating from almost 600 million years ago. Studies of these remarkable and enigmatic Ediacaran fossils are revealing important insights into how they interacted and reproduced. The display is curated by Dr Emily Mitchell as part of her NERC-funded research within the Department of Earth Sciences, and includes casts and 3D prints of these rare and important fossils from both Newfoundland and Leicestershire.

 



Monday to Friday
10:00 to 13:00 & 14:00 to 17:00

Saturday
10:00 to 16:00 

Sunday
Closed

The Museum will be closed from Monday 23rd December and re-open on Saturday 4th January




This half-term, WALLY, the world’s favourite children’s book character – wearing a red-and-white striped shirt and black-rimmed specs – will be travelling the country, appearing in museums, including a visit to the Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences, and the University Museum of Zoology, Cambridge. Families will be able to join the search for Wally as part of Where’s Wally? The Big Museum Hunt, organised by Walker Books and Kids in Museums, to celebrate the release of the new book, Where’s Wally? Double Trouble at the Museum.




My name is Andrew Simpson and I am a gallery volunteer at the Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences and a recent MGeol graduate in Geology with Paleobiology from the University of Leicester. My main interest is in vertebrate palaeontology, however, I like writing about all facets of palaeontology, from evolutionary history to fossil lagerstätten.