Identification Service

Found a rock, fossil or mineral? Bring it to the Museum and we will do our best to identify it for you, free of charge.

Please phone ahead to check that someone is available to look at your specimen and discuss it with you. If it's something unusual, we may ask you to leave it with us for a few days so we can find out more information before making an identification. Please note that on Saturdays we cannot guarantee that the relevant member of staff will be on duty.

Alternatively you can email us with the details of your specimen. Please send good quality photographs taken from different angles and using a ruler for scale so that we know how big it is. It is also very useful to know where you found the specimen.

Please do not send objects by post to the Museum for reasons of safety and security. However, we are happy to accept written enquiries accompanied by photographs.

Please note we do not offer a valuation service for specimens.




Monday to Friday
10:00 to 13:00 & 14:00 to 17:00

Saturday
10:00 to 16:00 

Sunday
CLOSED



Dec 1, 2018

Sir John Franklin’s ill-fated expedition to the North-West Passage has often been in the news ever since he left England on the 19th May, 1845 never to return. Successive searches throughout the 19th century eventually found artefacts and human remains. But it was not until 2014 the wreck of Franklin’s ship, HMS Erebus was found and two years later the wreck of HMS Terror. Now the extraordinary story of HMS Erebus is receiving new publicity thanks to the publication of Michael Palin’s new book – ‘Erebus : the story of a ship’. Whilst the earliest searches did not find any traces of Franklin and his crew, one of them, led by Captain Kellett did find a superb mammoth tusk, which is now part of the Sedgwick Museum’s Ice Age display.


Nov 29, 2018

The Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences, the oldest of the University of Cambridge museums, has appointed its first full-time director.