The Education Team

The Education Team at the Sedgwick Museum are available to help you plan your visit and talk you through classroom work on your topic. From dinosaurs, to the rock cycle or volcanoes, we have tips and resources that you might find helpful. You can send us an email or book a planning session with our Education team. 

Planning Sessions
We recommend booking a pre-visit meeting with our Education Co-ordinator to make the most of your group visit to the museum. In this session, you will get a short tour of the museum, highlighting objects appropriate to your area of interest, and a chance to plan your visit and work to support it in the classroom.

Teacher Training
The University of Cambridge Museums (UCM) are working together to provide new training opportunities for teachers to learn more about getting the most out of museum visits - look out for INSET sessions which will be advertised on the UCM website.

Contact us
Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences
University of Cambridge
Downing Street
Cambridge
CB2 3EQ
(01223) 333456
museumeducation@esc.cam.ac.uk

The Education Team
Nicola Skipper | Education Co-ordinator

Monday to Friday
10:00 to 13:00 & 14:00 to 17:00

Saturday
10:00 to 16:00 

Sunday
Closed



How do you get thirty-six 8-11yr olds excited about science in museums? Give them a ‘crime scene’ and skills to solve the crime.



Sir John Franklin’s ill-fated expedition to the North-West Passage has often been in the news ever since he left England on the 19th May, 1845 never to return. Successive searches throughout the 19th century eventually found artefacts and human remains. But it was not until 2014 the wreck of Franklin’s ship, HMS Erebus was found and two years later the wreck of HMS Terror. Now the extraordinary story of HMS Erebus is receiving new publicity thanks to the publication of Michael Palin’s new book – ‘Erebus : the story of a ship’. Whilst the earliest searches did not find any traces of Franklin and his crew, one of them, led by Captain Kellett did find a superb mammoth tusk, which is now part of the Sedgwick Museum’s Ice Age display.