Volunteer Programme

The work of the conservation laboratory is greatly aided by its volunteers. Their work involves basic cleaning of specimens, re-packaging in conservation grade foams or tissue or making made-to-measure boxes. Many of the Museum’s specimens were packed in drawers using materials that degrade over time or produce acids that could damage the specimens. These materials were used before modern conservation grade materials were available.

All volunteer places are currently filled in the Conservation lab. Find out more about our vounteering opportunities here.

  

Monday to Friday
10:00 to 13:00 & 14:00 to 17:00

Saturday
10:00 to 16:00 

Sunday
Closed



How do you get thirty-six 8-11yr olds excited about science in museums? Give them a ‘crime scene’ and skills to solve the crime.



Sir John Franklin’s ill-fated expedition to the North-West Passage has often been in the news ever since he left England on the 19th May, 1845 never to return. Successive searches throughout the 19th century eventually found artefacts and human remains. But it was not until 2014 the wreck of Franklin’s ship, HMS Erebus was found and two years later the wreck of HMS Terror. Now the extraordinary story of HMS Erebus is receiving new publicity thanks to the publication of Michael Palin’s new book – ‘Erebus : the story of a ship’. Whilst the earliest searches did not find any traces of Franklin and his crew, one of them, led by Captain Kellett did find a superb mammoth tusk, which is now part of the Sedgwick Museum’s Ice Age display.